US President Donald Trump

Trump’s COVID-19 treatment complete as second wave of virus is unfolding: Report

*Trump physician’s prognosis is said to have placed the US President among fortunate victims of the virus, who tend to display minor symptoms that improve over the course of a week

*CDC warns that people who are merely overweight, not necessarily obese, appear to be more vulnerable to more severe effects of COVID-19

Isola Moses | ConsumerConnect

While stressing the fact that overweight adults face special risks in contracting the novel Coronavirus pandemic, Dr. Sean Conley, US President Donald Trump’s White House physician in the White House, has said the president had completed his treatment for COVID-19.

Conley reportedly approved Trump’s return to public events Saturday, October 10, according to agency report.

The physician’s prognosis is said to have placed the United States President among the fortunate victims of the virus, who tend to display minor symptoms that improve over the course of a week or so.

Recall that Trump began treatment Friday, October 2, 2020.

It was learnt the three drugs used to treat the President are also drawing more interest from health experts.

These include Remdesivir, an antiviral drug that has emergency use authorisation (EUA) to treat COVID-19 patients.

Daniel O’Day, Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of Gilead told CNBC that the company would have enough of the drug by the end of this month to treat patients worldwide.

However, as cases of the virus infections are surging around the world, with fall and winter approaching in some lands, the second wave of the Coronavirus that health experts are fearing appears to be unfolding, according to report.

For instance, the World Health Organisation (WHO) reported a record one-day increase in worldwide cases Thursday, October 8, which is an increase of 338,779 in 24 hours, largely because of new cases in Europe.

The US is also dealing with a rapid increase in cases in most areas of the country.

An analysis of data compiled by Johns Hopkins University showed new cases of the virus increased by more than 45,000 in a 24-hour period.

Meanwhile, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has updated its warnings to state that people who are merely overweight, not necessarily obese, also appear to be more vulnerable to more severe effects of COVID-19.

Report stated that the National Center for Health Statistics estimates that more than 70 percent of adults in the US were either overweight or obese between 2015 and 2016.

The update also makes clear that people who smoke, or have a history of smoking, also appear to be at an increased risk from the coronavirus.

Other risk factors include cancer, kidney disease, heart conditions, and compromised immune systems.

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